Frequently Asked Questions

Should I seek medical care?

If you have a fever, cough, or difficulty breathing, you should seek medical attention—particularly if you have been in close contact with a confirmed case of COVID-19. Contact your healthcare provider before you go to tell them about your symptoms and recent travel history.

If you are sick, you can use virtual care options to seek medical treatment without exposing others to illness.

How is COVID-19 spread?

There is still much to learn about how this novel coronavirus is spread. It is thought to spread between people who are in close contact (within about 6 feet), and through respiratory droplets produced when an infected coughs or sneezes.

What are the symptoms?
Are there any preventative products?

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued its first emergency use authorization for a COVID-19 vaccine to Pfizer-BioNTech on December 11, 2020. The second, for Moderna’s vaccine, was issued on December 18, 2020.   

Clinical trials are currently underway for additional COVID-19 vaccines. We will keep our vaccine page updated with the latest information.

Should I be wearing a face mask?
What does isolation mean? What does quarantine mean?

Isolation and quarantine are both used to protect the public by preventing exposure to people who are sick or who may be sick.

  • "Isolation" refers to separating a sick person from others.
  • "Quarantine" refers to separating people who are not sick, but may have been exposed to an illness, from others.

You can read more about the distinction between these terms here.

What about international students?

Nationality is not a risk factor for COVID-19. An individual is only considered at risk for this illness if they or a very close contact have recently traveled to an area impacted by COVID-19, regardless of race.